Pore Pressure Prediction in the Caspian and Kazakhstan Regions; Taking a Geological Approach

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Pore Pressure Prediction in the Caspian and Kazakhstan Regions; Taking a Geological Approach

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Title: Pore Pressure Prediction in the Caspian and Kazakhstan Regions; Taking a Geological Approach
Author: Nadirov, Rauf; Swarbrick, Richard; O’Connor, Stephen; Lahann, Rick; Mallon, Anthony
Abstract: The Great Caspian is a leading, prolific producer of hydrocarbons; this region consists of the North, Middle and South Caspian (fields such as Tengiz, Karachaganak, Shah Deniz and ACG) and Kazakhstan. The later comprises five main basins; the Pre-Caspian, South Mangyshlak; North Ustyurt-Buzachi; Turgay and Chu-Sarysu. A major issue in exploiting these hydrocarbons is an understanding the varying pressure regimes therein, that are a direct result of the interaction between tectonics, lithology (e.g. salt, carbonates) and rates of sedimentation. Accurate pore pressure prediction is vital for successful and safe drilling in order to exploit these accumulations. We state that a geological approach is vital to supplement the other numerous methods for pore pressure prediction used worldwide and applied commonly in this region. These other methods often rely on shale-dominant lithologies – therefore, in this region using standard shale interpretations will be inaccurate. For instance, In the North Caspian, the Tengiz Field is located under less than 500 feet of Permian salt; above the salt the sediments are hydrostatic, below the Carboniferous carbonate reservoirs are close to lithostatic pressures (Anissimov et al, 2000); in these cases, traditional low temperature shale analysis will give only a partial solution at best. In the South Caspian, high rates of sedimentation and relatively low temperatures means that porosity/effective stress relationships in shales enable relatively accurate pressure prediction, however, reservoirs may be up to 5000 psi naturally drawn-down relative to the shales in fields such as Shah-Deniz via lateral drainage (Figure 1). Tozer and Borthwick (2011) reported recently that contacts in the Azeri Field were tilted as a result of a hydrodynamic aquifer in a laterally draining reservoir. Figure
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/1448
Date: 2012-10-29


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